Hamilton Jazzmaster Power Reserve Online Replica Watches Hands-On

Marking an anniversary of any kind is unique, but if it is a centenary, and it is a landmark that’s close to your heart, it’s even more critical to make sure to celebrate in style. That is why Swiss-American watch new Hamilton jazzmaster gmt replica watch is pulling out all the stops in 2018 to celebrate its first centenary of creating watches to the area of aviation with a brand-new limited edition out of its Khaki Aviation line.

The brand new Hamilton jazzmaster viewmatic power reserve replica watches Khaki X-Wind car Chrono Limited Edition is based on the popular Khaki X-Wind car Chrono that was initially launched in 2005 and has become a highlight of Hamilton’s aviation scope. Building on that solid foundation, the new 45mm model counts the recognizable drift angle calculator among its attributes but adds to it using a new COSC-certified movement with a silicon hairspring. Not only does this lend lightness to the motion, silicon is also known for its anti-magnetic properties. It is a detail, but an important one for pilots that spend a lot of the period in highly magnetized places such as airports, which can affect the accuracy or performance of a mechanical watch.

The new version comes with a multi-purpose dial and luminous hands, indexes, and numerals to ensure it’s not difficult to read. It is restricted, suitably, to 1,918 bits in a nod to the year Hamilton jazzmaster viewmatic skeleton gold fake watches initially worked with pilots’ watches. It is a version that is very likely to impress Hamilton lovers and aviation watch fans alike and sets the tone for the brand’s centenary celebrations. While many watch manufacturers are active in the realm of aviation, few can claim so many firsts or so many significant milestones since the first days of flight.

Based in Switzerland since 2003, the brand has continued its work with all the flying community, forging associations with pilots from other areas of aviation with the aim of creating new products for the cockpit. Although contemporary cockpits bear little relation to those from 1918, many pilots still appreciate an analog copy to their digitized instruments in case of a crisis. With features which range from second time zones to drift angle, landing rate, and gas requirement calculators, Hamilton jazzmaster thinline replica is a brand that prides itself on meeting the requirements of acute pilots as well as impressing those of us who love a classic aviation look in a wristwatch. The new Hamilton jazzmaster day date clonce watches Khaki X-Wind car Chrono Limited Edition draws inspiration from Hamilton’s long aviation history but has a firm focus on the long run with its revolutionary new elements.

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Japanese Movement Replica


DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt’s tenth anniversary is also marked by the launch of a new promotion campaign addressed to the “new emperors”. One of the illustrious forebears of brand founder Jérôme de Witt, including many crowned heads of Europe, is the Emperor Napoleon the First. DeWitt has been “drawing on its rich origins as well as projecting towards the present and the future by focusing on the new emperors of today and tomorrow, men and women all over the world who have achieved success.” At a nod to its history, the brand offers a reinterpretation of its ancestor’s famous hand-in-waistcoat gesture through understated and elegant visuals emerging in both masculine and female versions. The “Revolutionary by Tradition” signature accentuates the concept of a watchmaker with a bold vision, that of “creating a different type of Haute Horlogerie that’s authentic and commendable, combining age-old expertise and exceptional technical excellence.” The newest visuals feature watches from the Twenty-8-Eight collection. In 2013, it welcomes two new tourbillon versions, issued in 99-piece restricted series, as well as two new retrograde seconds versions. The Twenty-8-Eight Tourbillons play on contrasts with bold combinations of white gold and glacier-toned PVD-coated titaniumpink or pink stone and bronze-toned PVD-coated titanium. The dials associate Art Deco motivated vertical appliques using a beaded circle enclosing the tourbillon carriage. Their exceptionally graphic dials available in two colour variants are distinguished by a raised sunburst motif.



In addition to the blue dial, the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time is available with an off-white or black dial. Each, I feel, has its own important place in the collection, and I further want to say that even though this watch does have an Academia-style case, the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time looks very unique among the larger DeWitt watch collection.

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Above, I mentioned that DeWitt makes all of their own movements. It’s rather impressive what the small brand does at their factory, and true enough, they make all their own stuff. For that reason, their movements often have a very original look to them, even for those which are basic. Inside the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time is the DeWitt caliber DW1201 automatic. It features just the time with the two unique seconds hands, operating at a frequency of 21,600 (3Hz). Power reserve is a decent 65 hours, and the movement is made from 217 parts. I like the design of the movement which exposes the gears with a more grand view as compared to many others, and also has that cool art deco-style automatic rotor design with the castle-style crenelation around its edge to mimic the “columns” on the side of the watch case.

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

The DeWitt Academia Out Of Time comes only in 18k rose gold (for now) in a 42.5mm wide case. That actually makes it one of the smaller DeWitt watches out there (for men). The case is 12.85mm thick, and there is black rubber inlaid into the side of the case to further emphasize the “DeWitt imperial column” motif that is there. Or you could see the side of the case as looking like a row of angular (golden) robot teeth. Weird or not, I like details like that as well as the detailing and various finishing on the lugs.

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

For all its wonderful strangeness, you’ve got to love watches like the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time for the sheer effort to be successfully different. More so, I find that DeWitt watches are always so comfortably different, in that they aren’t trying to merely adapt existing aesthetic genres but that they are really just doing whatever they want from a design perspective. That is confidence, and the type of confidence I want to see in a brand whose motto is offering exclusive products to exclusive people. At least with a DeWitt on your wrist, you don’t need to feign personal originality.

Price for the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time reference AC.OUT.001 watch is $63,700. dewitt.ch

DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon Watch Hands-On Replica Wholesale Suppliers


DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Recently, while in Geneva, Switzerland, I had the opportunity to visit “manufacture DeWitt,” an impressive and resolutely niche high-end watch maker who produces almost everything themselves and is owned by Mr. Jerome DeWitt – whose family tree includes Napoleon Bonaparte. Jerome himself is a humble man whose main passions in life include mechanical things. One of the most impressive parts of the manufacture is his own personal collection of ancient machines (his “mechanical museum,” if you will). Jerome has the soul of an artist who is deeply interested in mechanics and the visual celebration thereof. It is actually his wife – who is currently in a directorial role at the company – that brought DeWitt back from some of its financial issues. Together, the dynamic DeWitt duo has strengthened the brand to make it the company of today that I really admire – a unique brand, whose timepieces all have something interesting to say (regardless of whether or not you like that statement).

As boutique as the brand is (well they aren’t that boutique, given the size of the place) an impressive number of new timepieces and movements are being produced at DeWitt on a regular basis. A great example of their technical and visual strength is a timepiece collection such as this DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon watch, which is new for 2015. It combines a skeletonized in-house-made tourbillon movement, a regulator style display, as well as jumping indicators for the hours and minutes. If that doesn’t make sense to you, then I’ve included a short video I posted of the DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon watch that demonstrates how the hands move in “jumping steps” versus in a sweeping motion as on most other watches.




DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon Watch Hands-On Hands-On

What makes this jumping hours and minutes system so relevant on a regulator-style display (where the hours, minutes, and seconds are each indicated on their own separate dial) is that, historically, these types of layouts were used on the most precise clocks (which were called regulator clocks). The name is based on the fact that the clocks were used to “regulate” the time of other clocks. Many of these had “dead seconds” hands which ticked versus sweeping for a more precise ability to read the time. While I don’t know if this is a novel concept (I sort of doubt that it entirely is) DeWitt has adopted the ticking concept of a dead seconds hand to the hours and minute hands. I find the concept interesting both technically and emotionally as the concept very much fits into the notion of idealized mechanical indication of the time.

In the gallery at the end of the article, you’ll find a few images from DeWitt as well as additional images I took of the DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon. I included those images to illustrate how there is a bit of a fashionable element to the collection, as well as that the 18k rose gold cases with their “imperial column” sides have dials accented in black, blue, and, remarkably, also green. The latter is an interesting option for sure. Like many other DeWitt watches, the DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon wears prodigiously at 46mm wide, but only 11.90mm thick. The new motto of the brand is “Heirs of Napoleon,” which should be an indicator to you that nothing about what DeWitt is trying to do attempts to be “discreet.” Which, for some people (or moods), is an excellent thing.

DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Looking at the Dewitt Academia Grand Tourbillon makes me think of something about how people judge watch design to day. I love how, from time to time, the luxury watch industry somehow inexplicably feels the need to apologize for producing ostentatious products. There is such a big push for “under the radar” and “stealth wealth” that each time certain types of watch collectors see something with a wild design they freak out. These people need to chill and recall that, like traditional art, timepieces are artistic as well. They also serve a double purpose to express both taste and status. You might not like the design of a watch but there is no need to yell from the hilltops that brands are wrong to attempt original or fresh designs. Luxury watches are about showing off (something), and whether or not you agree with what that thing is let’s not delude ourselves that many high-end timepieces are meant to have a place on someone’s wrist who feels as though they have afforded themselves the right to “say” something to to the world.

In fact, that is one of the major things I like about companies like DeWitt – they don’t produce the same old types of interchangeable horological items that could come from any number of brands. These are distinct works of art with a serious level of mechanical thought and effort put into them. An interesting detail is the signature on the back of each of DeWitt’s most complicated timepieces such as the DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon. A single watchmaker assembles each of the watches, and their signature is engraved on the back of the watch. It was interesting to view several different DeWitt timepieces and see various names engraved in cursive font on the backs of the movements – a classy touch, if you ask me.

DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Speaking of the movement, let’s talk about the in-house made DeWitt caliber DW 8030 that sits so nicely exposed inside of the DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon case. In many ways, the movement is extremely traditional despite the modern look of the case and the dial design. Composed of 327 parts, the DW 8030 movement builds on 2010’s caliber DW 8028 which was DeWitt’s first totally in-house tourbillon movement. The basic architecture is the same, but the regulator-style time display and a unique bridge design has been included in the DW 8030.

The movement is manually wound and has a power reserve of 65 hours operating at a modest 2.5Hz (18,000 bph). This slower frequency is sometimes desired for tourbillons, as it allows for a greater visual appreciation of the oscillating balance wheel. The free-spring balance wheel is further fitted with a Spiral Straumann balance spring that has a Philips curve. In addition to the time, the movement also offers a date indicator disc whose window is at 3 o’clock on the dial.

DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon Watch Hands-On Hands-On

On the wrist, the DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon wears largely but isn’t uncomfortable, given the fact that the case is not too thick. The jutting lugs will, however, make it difficult for some people to wear this case style and not feel as though it is too large. Over the years, I’ve further come to very much appreciate the distinct look of DeWitt bezels that remind me of crenelation on castles. There is a sort of opulence to the style when it is rendered in gold. DeWitt often does a good job of producing a watch that goes with a landed aristocracy sort of lifestyle – its really what I want to see on the wrists of an eccentric old world family with generations of wealth.

Legibility may not be the DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon’s strong suit, but it isn’t that difficult to read. Seconds can be “inferred” from the spinning tourbillon, while the separated hour and minute hands have pluses and minuses to legibility. On the plus side, because of their jumping nature, they should point right to their respective markers. This is particularly useful for the small hours dial. Having said that, neither the minute nor hour dial is remarkably easy to read, which is especially the case with the minute indicator dial. DeWitt puts all that time and effort into a jumping minute hand… but doesn’t create a dial with clear minute indicators that allow the wearer to appreciate the precision of this functionality.

DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon Watch Hands-On Hands-On

In a nutshell, and based upon my above statement, I feel that separately, the case design with dial and the DW 8030 movement are interesting and laudable creations. When put together, they make for a lovely design, but I still don’t feel that the dial design of the DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon is able to fully demonstrate the technical and legible intelligence of the jumping hour and minute hands. It would actually be easy for DeWitt to come out with a “purer” version of the watch that remedies this.

The DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon watches are also all limited editions. The various models such as the AC.GT.001, AC.GT.002, and AC.GT.003 are all limited to 99 pieces each with a price of $312,000 USD. dewitt.ch

Panerai L’Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Replica Watches Free Shipping


Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

As a halo product designed not to sell in large volume, but to showcase the upper-end of the technical abilities at Panerai, the 2018 L’Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT is one hell of an horological product. Referenced as the Panerai PAM00920 (PAM920), this $200,000+, 50mm wide mega watch is something we’re sure you’ll want to know about (even if only a precious few will be able to afford one).

The base caliber and concept behind the Panerai L’Astronomo is derived from a model released by the brand a few years ago in 2010. This new model is more than a fresh aesthetic offering but features changes to the movement as well as a new opportunity for brand fans to discover the top-end of what Panerai can produce. Mind you that the mega-complex L’Astronomo is a far more complicated “haute horology” product from the makers of normally very elegant and often simple Italian-style sport watches. I say all this because while it certainly fits within the core Panerai timepiece theme, it is in many ways a separate type of product when compared to the majority of what Panerai is known for producing.

Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

All images by David Bredan

Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

When Panerai first came out with the L’Astronomo Tourbillon, they claimed that it was inspired by Galileo Galilei (for obvious astronomical reasons). The astronomical functions of the watches aren’t easily apparent when viewing the front-side of the watch save for the equation of time complication. Of course, there are the sunrise and sunset indicators on the periphery of the dial that require at the least a complex calendar complication. Turn the PAM920 over on its rear and you’ll see one of the newest elements of this watch, which is a moon phase indicator – that is different from the previous 2010 model’s star chart. Opposite a representation of the sun, the moon phase disc itself is beautifully detailed and also turns every 24 hours as an additional indication of the time.

Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

Panerai produces the complicated lattice work on the skeletonized dial of the L’Astronomo Luminor using 3D-printed titanium. They say that it’s the only way to achieve the desired level of quality and precision. It isn’t necessarily apparent to most people on these watches, but if you ask yourself “how did they produce that?” in the watch world, you’ll often be left guessing since exotic production techniques are sometimes used for such exotic products. Even though the PAM920 doesn’t fit the mold of most Panerai watches, it still uses a (large) Luminor 1950-style case and dial that keep it solidly within the brand.

Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

Speaking of the dial, we have more complications to look at including the time with subsidiary seconds dial, second time zone hand (in 12-hour format), month indicator, date (more on that in a moment), and as I said, an equation of time and sunrise/sunset indicators that both use nifty linear scales. It is important to consider that all of the Panerai L’Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT watches will be produced on order. One of the biggest reasons for this is the sunrise and sunset indicators. These features need to be calibrated to a particular part of the world (only digital watches with these complications can be adjusted for different cities – in other words, different longitude and latitude coordinates). So what Panerai does is have the customer select which city he or she wants the sunrise and sunset information to correspond to.

Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

Panerai makes a big deal out of the date indicator. Why? The reason is because if you look closely, you’ll notice that while you can see the date numeral in the date window, even though the dial is skeletonized you cannot view the date wheel. Cool right? That’s because Panerai designed a system using two sheets of polarized glass – with one of those sheets being the date disc itself. Right over the date window the polarized planes overlap in a manner so as to allow for half of the light of the lower disc to enter and thus, you can see the date. Given how polarization works the date disc appears almost invisible everywhere else.

That really makes it among those smaller DeWitt watches out there (for guys). The case is 12.85mm thick, and there is black rubberized inlaid into the side of the situation to further highlight the “DeWitt imperial pillar” motif that is there. Or you might see the side of this case as appearing like a row of angular (golden) robot teeth. Weird or not, I enjoy details like this as well as the detailing and assorted finishing the lugs.For all of its wonderful strangeness, you’ve got to appreciate watches such as the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time for its sheer effort to be different. More so, I discover that DeWitt watches are always so comfortably different, so they aren’t hoping to only adapt existing aesthetic genres however they are really just doing whatever they need from a design standpoint. That is assurance, and the type of assurance I wish to see in a brand whose motto is offering exclusive products to exclusive people. At least using a DeWitt in your wrist, you don’t need to feign personal originality.Price for the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time benchmark AC.OUT.001 watch is63,700. Back in 2003, Jérôme p Witt established the DeWitt brand with attention on complex timepieces.The Academia collection from Manufacture DeWitt has been distinguished by its own clever melding of classically elegant design elements with modern, sporty ones. The latest example can be found in this week’s Watch to Watch, the DeWitt Academia Chronostream II.The DeWitt Academia Chronostream II represents the next generation of the first Chronostream version, which incorporated in the center of its dial, involving two chronograph subdials, an appliqué pattern motivated by the radiator grilles of classic racing cars (a hobby of new founder — and descendant of Napoleon Bonaparte — Jerôme De Witt).

Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

It is almost easy to forget that the in-house made and developed Panerai caliber P.2005/GLS manually-wound movement also has a tourbillon. Alas, it was developed at a time when pretty much all “mega luxury” watches needed to have tourbillons. These days the tourbillon isn’t exactly passe, but its appearance as an exclusive status symbol has certainly lost a lot of weight. The tourbillon in the P.2005/GLS is actually somewhat novel because of the axis that it spins on. Rather than spin on the tourbillon cage’s vertical axis, the tourbillon in this Panerai watch spins on its horizontal axis. I also like that this is among the rarer 4Hz (28,800bph) tourbillon movements as opposed to 3Hz, which is the frequency most tourbillon balance wheels operate at. The movement further has four days of power reserve (with a handy indicator on the rear of the watch) and is produced from 451 parts.

Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

Given that each L’Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT timepiece is “made to order,” Panerai can also customize the case material, finishing, and even the dial and hand colors. What they can’t do is make this big watch any smaller if you aren’t into a 50mm wide case. In this form the case is in polished and brushed titanium – and it looks lovely with great quality. The case is also water-resistant to 100m – making it at least somewhat durable like a Panerai watch should be. Ironically, even some Panerai “sport watches” are only water-resistant to 30m (even though the brand’s entire theme is Italian dive watches).

Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

Panerai L'Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 Hands-On Hands-On

With an incredible “watch lovers” movement and cool Panerai look, the Panerai L’Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT is an incredible collector’s watch for high-end buyers. It has exclusivity in that no two of these watches are likely to even be made the same, along with a movement that no mom and pop horology shop can produce. People who invest in a product like this clearly need to have a deep appreciation for the Panerai brand. Though, that isn’t enough. You can spend big bucks on some rare vintage Panerai models if you merely want to spend a lot. This is a watch for those who love Panerai’s style, but also love to admire the complication and prestige of a serious piece of high-end mechanical horology. Even though it will totally fly over the heads of so many Panerai fans, it does serve its purpose well as a halo product for the brand. The Panerai L’Astronomo Luminor 1950 Tourbillon Moon Phases Equation Of Time GMT PAM00920 has a retail price of $230,000 USD. panerai.com

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Replica Wholesale Suppliers


DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Earlier in 2015, I had the opportunity to visit the watch manufacture of DeWitt in Geneva. The DeWitt brand has had its ups and downs over the years along with the global economy, but has recently really sorted out its organizational issues and is more than back on track to creating some of the most interesting and exclusive timepieces around – such as this quite rare DeWitt Academia Out Of Time collection. What makes DeWitt watches interesting and exclusive in my opinion? Well, in addition to producing a whole universe of very unique in-house made movements with some complications you won’t see anywhere else, DeWitt often employs designs and styles quite removed from the rest of the watch industry. With that said, DeWitt is still thoroughly a Swiss-born-and-bred watch company living in harmony with other unique niche luxury brands.

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Someday, I’ll write more about Mr. Jerome DeWitt, the polite and shy lover of all things mechanical who is both an ancestor of Napoleon Bonaparte and probably a genius of sorts – as well as Ms. DeWitt, the fiery engine behind the operation who speaks with New York-style intention, and old-world landed aristocracy expectation.

For now, I’d simply like to describe the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time watch and what makes this an interesting timepiece. I sort of feel bad for those people who cannot see this watch in person. You literally cannot understand what the dial looks like in action without seeing it operate. The main dial has two subdials with the left being a “flying time” indicator and the right being a “beat second” indicator. What is that all about? Well, the beat seconds hand is just a dead seconds hand. DeWitt is really into dead seconds complications (consider for example the cool DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon that we go hands-on with here). Those are when an otherwise sweeping seconds hand on a mechanical movement “ticks” similar to how seconds hands operate on quartz watches. For watch lovers, the irony is wonderful (in addition to the history of the functionality).

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On
Meanwhile, the New Academia Grande Date and Hora Mundi would be the first to look in steel-clad versions. Graced with revisited dials and fitted with steel bracelets or rubber straps, they radiate a lifestyle aura that is intended for a youthful and lively clientele, these distinctive anniversary watches are issued in 200-piece restricted editions.DeWitt manufacture has always been unconventional when it comes to its watchmaking techniques. Not that people complain much about it, in fact we love how they create unconventional watches. So for the rebels on the market, there’s always some reason to not follow traditional style, a break out of it pretty much brings so many good things on the table. Speaking of these, here we’ve got the Academia Limitless Drive, a beautiful watch created in a sense as what DeWitt fabricate could have consistently done.This new watch will initially be exhibited at Geneva in the Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie 2018 (January 15–19). Its distinguishing feature is that the rotating endless screw visible in the middle of the dialup, unconventional really but in these times, we’ve seen more from the world designs.Naturally, the unidirectional and irreversible movement of the twist is quite fascinating. It’s an absolute nod to what time really is, it always moves forward. The screw can be linked to the power book’s winding system adding more usefulness to the mystical nature.

What is very cool about the beat seconds hand is that it exists over a skeletonized view of the movement which allows you to see how this mechanism works. In fact, this is the first time I can think of that I’ve seen a dead seconds hand executed (with the view). I believe DeWitt designed the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time this way for two reasons. One is to offer a view of the particular contraption which allows the dead seconds hand to operate, and second is as a subtle reminder that “this is, indeed, not a quartz timepiece.”

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

To the left of the beat second hand is something else interesting. This is the “flying time” dial and it is really a sort of foudroyante hand. Some watches that have hands that make a full revolution each second, and we refer to those as “flying hands.” The reason is that they appear to move so quickly, watchmakers say they are “flying.” Rather than a traditional hand, DeWitt developed two overlapping discs. The discs have small holes, and when the upper disc moves, it creates a unique animation on the dial.

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Jerome DeWitt explained that the purpose of the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time watch was to demonstrate the visual contrast between two different indicators that nevertheless operate each second. There is also the contrast between the slow and the fast. It is a poetic concept, and I have to admit that if I wore the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time on my wrist, I would probably be spending a lot of time idly staring at it.

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Otherwise, the dial merely indicates the time, and much of the upper part of the face looks relatively stark compared to the bottom of the dial. It is also unique how DeWitt borders each of the two subdials separately. It makes for a dial which looks both asymmetrical and symmetrical at the same time – which is something I don’t recall ever saying before.

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Perhaps my favorite version of the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time watch is the model with the royal blue dial. Boy, does that one look cool. The odd movements on the dial mixed with the distinctive case and loud dial make for a decidedly “courtly” wrist statement. Anything but conservative, I just find it cool in a sort of excessive “see what fun toys I can afford” way.

Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Replica Watches Free Shipping


Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Hands-On

I began writing this article over a month ago in my mind, but haven’t begun reducing it to writing until now. It’s not that I struggle to find words suitable for this watch, rather, its a watch that inspires me to say so much. In fact, calling it a watch is almost a misnomer, because it is something else entirely. Yes it does fit on your wrist, and it does tell the time, but its really not meant for that. What I’d like to do is consider how some people might approach seeing this watch, and then present my articulated perception of what the DeWitt WX-1 Concept may really be.

Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Hands-On

“You see this watch? This watch costs more than your car.” Alec Baldwin proclaims this confidently in the movie version of Glengarry Glen Ross (see clip here on YouTube; excellent performance). It’s a powerful line. If you wear a DeWitt WX-1, you can similarly proclaim to most of America, a related yet enhanced version of this statement. “You see this watch? This watch costs more than your house.” Thats right, the 33 WX-1 watches made are priced at 400,000 Euros each, which is about $650,000. A price far above the average home value in America. Which goes to a question that many have asked me, “why is the watch so expensive?” Or better stated “what makes the watch worth so much money.” It is a price meant for an audience. It is unclear who is paying this price, but I am sure some do. The watch has no precious gems, and while it does contain some gold, thats not really were the value is. I explain the number of skilled hours of labor put in to both developing and constructing the watch as a hint to its value. I explain the uniqueness of the design, and undecipherable (for most) complication of the internal components. People are swayed. They just didn’t get it, yet somehow I did, though it was difficult to explain.

Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Hands-On

I flashback in my mind to the moment I was handed the watch. It was contained in a cardboard box carefully wrapped in “luxury watch grade” plastic saran wrap. I handled it with great care knowing what it was, but feeling unworthy of fully appreciating all that it represented and the craftsmanship gifted by DeWitt into its design. You’ll notice how big the watch is, a beast by any accord, but this is no wild animal. It was remarkably light and solid feeling. The materials in the 191 gram weighing watch range from an aluminum-lithium alloy (among other types of aluminum), grade 5 titanium, gold, steel, sapphire crystal and rubber. Despite the many moving parts and moving case, it did not rattle, and seemed to be make from a single block with two straps attached to it. I immediately noticed the larger than life deployment shaped as a large DeWitt logo. There was something all too appropriate about it. No matter how strange the watch was in comparison to everything else out there, it felt comfortable in its own skin. As though it enjoyed an unstated sense of refinement. I continued to ponder the innate appeal the WX-1 held.

The shape of the case has little to do with traditional watches. The look differs based on the position you place it in. From one angle it looks like an early science fiction space craft, from another angle it looks like a fancy fire hydrant. These associations are a good thing in my opinion. Too abstract a shape and the eye is dissuaded from its fashion, searching for meaning. It is a benefit to any design when a mere glance alludes to shapes of familiar things; my compliments to a truly organic schematic, with varied origins.

Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Hands-On

It was not until I was able to remove the plastic wrap that I began to see what this watch could do. The entire case pulls open to reveal a view of the movement. A complex flying tourbillon with a 21 power reserve due to the five barrels. The tourbillon movement is placed in a vertical position near a small porthole on the side of the case, for constant viewing. Aside from viewing the columns of gears inside the case, you have a view of a dedicated power reserve indicator, which is a necessary element when you only need to wind the watch once or twice a month.

As an unexpected modern twist, DeWitt provides a USB powered watch winder for the WX-1. I have to say that I was amazed to hear this. Why? Well first of all watch companies are notoriously slated in the past. I mean we are talking the dedicated production of mechanical watches, that from a pure efficiency standpoint more or less seceded from being practical once the quartz watch movement proved to be infinitely cheaper and more accurate. Ah, but the mechanical watch is so much more sexy. Why do we prefer a fine vintage wine, when Pabst Blue Ribbon beer will do the trick? It is because mechanical watches are seeped in tradition, romance, and the most important element of all to a coveting collector; they are extremely difficult to design and manufacture. So when DeWitt coupled the WX-1 with a USB charger, I was impressed and intrigued. The USB charging unit functions like a little stand for the watch. You deploy the dedicated winding stem from the watch with a small lever (the winding stem is located in the side porthole next to the tourbillon window). Once the stem is extended, it connects with the charger that turns it intermittently. It’s amusing that you can connect this triumph of mechanical nostalgia to a computer for power purposes. I find this fact charming, and perhaps highly telling of watch the luxury watch industry is all about; producing creations of art and excess that must still conform to lifestyle and practical considerations.

Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Hands-On

Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Hands-On

Having said that, you probably cannot be expected to wear the DeWitt WX-1 too often. It is frankly too big to even fit under a shirt sleeve, and you’d be mortified to ding it. On the same note, it is interesting that DeWitt probably spent the least amount of effort on the aspect of this watch that tells the time. The clock portion of the watch sticks out like a node from the mothership. Unlike traditional watches that use hands, the WX-1 has three two rotating discs. Line them up with the small arrow at the top of the dial, and you have the time. First appearance tells me that the discs are some manner of compass or instrument too complicated for my cognition. Closer inspection however reveals numbers commonly found on a watch face, this must surely be where I tell the time, and it is. This isn’t DeWitt trying to confuse anyone, but rather to ensure the effect of the watch is not last. The vision of a grand complications, whose read out of information has been as beautifully conceived as the body that holds it.

Smooth pushing the WX-1 case back together I realize that the windows all over the watch are all what appear to be sapphire crystals, extremely hard to fabricate in these shapes. I am thoroughly impressed by this watch, and relish in seeing it in the hands of others. What’s to say about the design? I submitted to the fact that to each their own. I like it its looks (even though the WX-1 does not appear to care what I think), I see it as Jules Verne-esque. Like an Victorian era spaceship. Some would define the look as “steampunk,” and I would not disagree. Vianney Halter has successfully created his entire brand of high-end watches around the steampunk aesthetic, and the concept is masterful. The WX-1 fits all these labels, and yet it emulates nothing specifically. The detailed rivets around the cases are meant to signify the labor put into the watch. That hands put this masterpiece together, rivet by rivet, not machine. A true creation of manual labor in its most refined form, a combination of engineering and art that only the watch industry can convey, and value clear as day in this DeWitt.

Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Hands-On

I spent my time with the DeWitt WX-1 a few weeks, but continue to ponder its implications. It occurred to me while strolling in San Francisco past art galleries, only blocks from Shapur where I viewed the watch that this was no mere accessory. You can hang a poster in your home, or priceless art. Both serve the same purpose in the most basic of definitions, but clearly they are not the same. The same logic applies here and translates to suggest that the DeWitt, while representing itself as a fully functioning wrist watch, is rather a masterpiece of art. It passes several tests to this degree. There are limited numbers, they are not easily reproduced, and the design and manufacture are accomplished by recognized masters.

Years from now I’ll see a DeWitt WX-1 in a museum, as it is of that quality. I’ll think to myself lucky as having had the time to experience it when it was new, a product available for purchase, even if only for the super rich. Leonardo DaVinci, Pablo Picasso, and Vincent Van Gogh were all artists with work for sale at some point. The DeWitt WX-1 watches may be a creation of several artists, not just one; but like works by these other masters, the few examples will one day reach a place when they too will seem like absolute bargains at their original prices.

And now, some words from our friends at DeWitt (in my words):

DeWitt appreciates interest in their watches, and wants to work with potential buyers closely. DeWitt does not allow its authorized retailers to sell over the internet. Further, DeWitt wants to remind you that pre-owned watches not purchased from an authorized dealer will certainly not carry any warranty coverage (so repairs and service will be costly). Their position is that if you don’t purchase a watch from an authorized dealer they cannot guarantee a watch’s authenticity and conformity to their high quality standards.  If you want to purchase a DeWitt watch from an authorized dealer, then please visit their website, DeWitt.ch, and follow these steps:

The DeWitt Academia Out Of Time comes only in 18k rose gold (for the time being) at a 42.5mm wide case. That actually makes it one of the smaller DeWitt watches on the market (for men). The case is 12.85mm thick, and there is black rubber inlaid into the side of the case to further highlight the “DeWitt imperial column” motif that is there. Or you might view the side of the case as looking like a row of angular (gold) robot teeth. Unusual or not, I enjoy details like this in addition to the detailing and assorted completing the lugs.For all its superb strangeness, you’ve got to appreciate watches like the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time for the sheer effort to be different. More so, I find that DeWitt watches are so comfortably different, in that they aren’t trying to only adapt existing aesthetic genres but they’re really just doing anything they need from a design standpoint. That is confidence, and also the sort of assurance I want to find in a new whose motto is providing exclusive goods to exclusive men and women. At least using a DeWitt on your wrist, you do not have to feign private originality.Price to your DeWitt Academia Out Of Time benchmark AC.OUT.001 watch is63,700. In 2003, Jérôme p Witt launched the DeWitt brand with focus on complex timepieces.The Academia collection from Manufacture DeWitt has been distinguished by its clever melding of elegant design elements with contemporary, sporty ones.

1. After the page has loaded after the intro, click on the “Network” tab to access a map of the world.

2. Find your region or country and then scroll through the list of authorized dealers and find one that is closest to you, and then contact them. If you don’t live nearby and still want to consummate a sale, delivery options are available I am sure.

3. If you’d like to know more about the product line or to contact DeWitt directly, then you can click on the “Contact” tab at the bottom of the page. I’ve been assured that someone will get back to you with haste.

See DeWitt watches on eBay here.

See DeWitt watches on Amazon here.

Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Hands-On
VTG DEWITT 17 JEWELS INCABLOC 1 20 10K GOLD FILLED LADIES WATCH
$18.00
Time Remaining: 18h 16m
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Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Hands-On
DeWitt Glorious Knight Automatic Timepiece Stainless Steel with Black Dial
$1,999.00
Time Remaining: 1d 15m
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Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Hands-On
Dewitt Glorious Knight Automatic Stainless Steel Mens Watch FTVPTS001S
$4,329.00
Time Remaining: 1d 1h 27m
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Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Hands-On
Vintage 1950s Hamilton Dewitt 10K GF Case Mechanical cal 747
$200.00
Time Remaining: 1d 13h 5m
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Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Hands-On
Dewitt Glorious Knight Stainless Steel Automatic Mens Watch FTVHMS001RFB
$4,490.00
Time Remaining: 1d 14h 18m
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Experience With The DeWitt WX-1 Concept; A Watch Defying Convention With Unorthodox, Yet Timeless Composure Hands-On
Dewitt Glorious Knight Stainless Steel Automatic Mens Watch FTVHMS002S
$4,590.00
Time Remaining: 1d 16h 35m
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Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Replica Wholesale Suppliers


Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

As its name implies, the Timex Archive collection is a series of watches influenced by the storied history of the American watch company, Timex. For watch enthusiasts there are some real bargains in here, and for those just getting into timepieces – there are some excellent ways to enjoy a classic look with a modern edge. Right now I’m looking at two interesting Archive Collection watches in the Metropolis sub-family of timepieces. What these two watches have in common are some design/material treatments as well as a neat new reversible strap that features a stripe of reflective material on one side. This reflective material is actually pretty cool – even if you aren’t going for that night runner look. One Metropolis watch is the three-hand Allied, while the chronograph model is the Allied Chrono. Each are well under $200 in price.

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

All images by Ariel Adams

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

The most refreshing part of the Timex Archive collection is that the watches are inspired by the past, but clearly not stuck in it. The unspoken design ethos here is to take popular vintage-style designs, and freshen them up a bit for modern consumption. Timex seems to implicitly understand that the look of function-focused watch designs from the past (when people still mostly relied on their wristwatch to tell the time) mixed with modern material treatments, colors, and design sensibilities is a wise strategy for appealing to today’s consumers. Unlike most fashion watches at these price levels, Timex doesn’t seem to forget that its products should first and foremost actually be good watches. This means that on top of spirited looks, these watches are comfortable, legible, and built for dependability. Such a claim cannot be made for many of the other approximately $150–$200 priced watches out there.

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Clearly without wanting to confuse you, Timex produces both a watch called the Allied Chronograph and the Allied Chrono. Yes these watches are similar – but actually different watches, with different cases, and different straps (though they share the same movement). This particular Timex Allied Chrono is the reference TW2R76800LG, which means it has an off-white dial and a steel case with a sandblasted finish. The first interesting detail is the color of the dial, which is actually modified by the crystal. Timex gives this crystal a light “smoked finishing,” which means it is just a hair bit darker than a standard clear crystal. The effect doesn’t really reduce legibility, and adds an interesting sense of personality and character to the design.

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

The Allied Chrono case is water-resistant to 100m and is a decent 43mm wide on the wrist. Timex points out that the case material is brass (like many mechanical watch movement parts) while the exterior is steel. They aren’t entirely clear on how that is achieved, though I am guessing the steel outside is plated and then given the sandblasted finishing. The Allied Chrono dial is simple (in a vintage-style manner) but legible and attractive. The “light cement” color of the dial is matched with slightly glossy hour markers and orange color accents. The hands are properly sized and easy to read while also being painted with luminant. I want to forward a suggestion to Timex here that the hands be colored the same color as the hour markers in order to further aesthetic harmony. Lose out on darkness viewing you say? Not here. Most of us watch collectors have long forgotten Timex’s signature feature, which is a backlight they call INDIGLO. The feature is still as neat as it was when I first played with it as a child – being activated by pressing in the crown. When the crown is pressed, the entire dial glows an “ectoplasmic” green offering easy readability in even total darkness. So maybe it isn’t a terrible idea to make the hands black… or at least the outlines in black.

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Inside the Timex Allied Chrono is a caliber M921 quartz chronograph movement produced by them. The movement has the time, date, and a 1/20th of a second chronograph complication. I should also point out that you can independently set the hour hand, which is good for traveling. This is also how you set the date. For a sub-$200 watch the detailing is really nice, including features such as a flange ring around the dial and well-detailed, crisp case construction. Attached to the 43mm wide case is a 20mm wide gray-color semi-NATO-style strap (given that it slips through the lug spring bars as opposed to being connected to them). The strap is produced and designed by Timex. It also happens to be rather comfortable.

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

I recall Timex showing me these straps last year and being excited about them. One side of this gray-colored strap is woven polyester with an attractive pattern. The other side – which is how I am wearing it in the images – is nylon, with a reflective “racing stripe” down the middle. That the strap is produced from two different layers is interesting in and of itself. Reversing the strap is actually really simple and just involves pulling out the strap, flipping it around, and then weaving the other side into spring bars. One of the most clever design features of the strap is how it is meant to have the buckle tongue move to either side depending what side of the strap you are using. I also like that its reversibility is very discreet – meaning if no one ever told you that the strap was designed to be reversible, you might easily miss that detail. Some might take issue with this discreet design choice, but I happen to like little “secrets” such as this.

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Maybe my favorite variant of this DeWitt Academia Out Of Time watch is your model together with the royal blue dial. Boy, does that you look trendy. The strange movements on the dial mixed with the distinctive case and loudly dial make for a decidedly “courtly” wrist statement. Anything but conservative, I just find it cool in a kind of excess “see what interesting toys that I can afford” way.In addition to the blue dial, the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time can be obtained with an off-white or black dial. Each, I feel, has its own important place in the group, and that I need to state that although this view will not have an Academia-style case, the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time looks really distinctive among the bigger DeWitt watch collection.Above, I said that DeWitt makes all of their own movements. It’s quite impressive what the small brand does at their factory, and accurate enough, they create their own things. Because of this, their movements frequently have a very first appearance to them , even for those that are basic. Power reserve is a decent 65 hours, and the motion is created from 217 parts. I like the plan of the motion that exposes the gears with a more grand perspective compared to many others, and also has that cool art deco-style automated rotor design together with the castle-style crenelation about its edge to mimic the “columns” on the side of the watch case.

The other Timex Archive Collection Metropolis watch on my wrist here is the reference TW2R75100LG Allied quartz movement-powered three-hand model with a smokey orange-tinted crystal and of course, the utility of the INDIGLO backlight system. This is a great looking timepiece with a fun personality thanks to the modern-themed reflective dual-side strap (this time in navy blue color) and the colorful take on the classic field watch dial. Military watch lovers will instantly find appeal in this dial style, while fashionistas will like the play on colors and materials. I’ve said it before and I will say it again, to make old watches look fresh… simply apply a new coat of paint.

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

The Metropolis Allied comes in the same style case but with a 40mm wide size and oddly only 50m of water resistance. One might think that with its extra pushers the Allied Chrono would have less water resistance, but the reserve is true in this instance. If water resistance is more important to you in a three-hand vintage-military look, then Timex also offers the Archive Collection Metropolis Navi Ocean models that have 100m of water resistance (albeit in a 38mm wide case with a rotating diver’s-style bezel). Unlike the chronograph movement, this three-hand movement is a bit on the louder side (although not as loud as a standard Swatch), which is important to note for those who want a silent timepiece.

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

If you don’t fancy the reflective strap with the orange Allied watch, then Timex also offers an almost identical watch in the reference TW2R31000LG Timex Scout. All that appears to be different about the Scout compared to the Allied is the strap, which is also reversible but with orange and gray stripes on one side, and all gray on the other side. More so, if smoked orange isn’t your thing, then the Timex Allied is also available as the reference TW2R75200LG with a black and yellow dial, slightly different reversible strap, and an “aged steel” case aesthetic for the same price.

Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied & Allied Chrono Watches Hands-On Hands-On

Putting myself in the mindset of someone in the market for a conservative but spirited sub-$200 sport watch and something from Timex would certainly be on my short list. The vintage-style aesthetics with modern design sensibilities make for an easy draw, but so does Timex’s dedication to making the best possible product at these affordable price points. Nothing flashy, just a durable, decent tool watch that isn’t objectionable to look at. Your new beater watch could very well be one of these. The Timex Archive Collection Metropolis Allied Chrono reference TW2R76800LG has a retail price of $170 USD and the Allied reference TW2R75100LG has a retail price of $140 USD. timex.com

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Grade 1 Replica Watches


DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Earlier in 2015, I had the opportunity to visit the watch manufacture of DeWitt in Geneva. The DeWitt brand has had its ups and downs over the years along with the global economy, but has recently really sorted out its organizational issues and is more than back on track to creating some of the most interesting and exclusive timepieces around – such as this quite rare DeWitt Academia Out Of Time collection. What makes DeWitt watches interesting and exclusive in my opinion? Well, in addition to producing a whole universe of very unique in-house made movements with some complications you won’t see anywhere else, DeWitt often employs designs and styles quite removed from the rest of the watch industry. With that said, DeWitt is still thoroughly a Swiss-born-and-bred watch company living in harmony with other unique niche luxury brands.

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Someday, I’ll write more about Mr. Jerome DeWitt, the polite and shy lover of all things mechanical who is both an ancestor of Napoleon Bonaparte and probably a genius of sorts – as well as Ms. DeWitt, the fiery engine behind the operation who speaks with New York-style intention, and old-world landed aristocracy expectation.

For now, I’d simply like to describe the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time watch and what makes this an interesting timepiece. I sort of feel bad for those people who cannot see this watch in person. You literally cannot understand what the dial looks like in action without seeing it operate. The main dial has two subdials with the left being a “flying time” indicator and the right being a “beat second” indicator. What is that all about? Well, the beat seconds hand is just a dead seconds hand. DeWitt is really into dead seconds complications (consider for example the cool DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon that we go hands-on with here). Those are when an otherwise sweeping seconds hand on a mechanical movement “ticks” similar to how seconds hands operate on quartz watches. For watch lovers, the irony is wonderful (in addition to the history of the functionality).

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

What is very cool about the beat seconds hand is that it exists over a skeletonized view of the movement which allows you to see how this mechanism works. In fact, this is the first time I can think of that I’ve seen a dead seconds hand executed (with the view). I believe DeWitt designed the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time this way for two reasons. One is to offer a view of the particular contraption which allows the dead seconds hand to operate, and second is as a subtle reminder that “this is, indeed, not a quartz timepiece.”

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Earlier in 2015, I had the opportunity to See the watch production of DeWitt in Geneva. The DeWitt brand has experienced its ups and downs over the years alongside the global market, but has recently actually sorted out its organizational issues and is over back on path to creating a few of the most interesting and exclusive timepieces around – like this quite infrequent DeWitt Academia Out Of Time collection. What makes DeWitt watches exclusive and interesting in my opinion? Well, in addition to creating a complete universe of very unique in-house made motions with a few complications you won’t find anyplace else, DeWitt often employs designs and styles rather removed from the remainder of the watch industry. That said, DeWitt remains completely a Swiss-born-and-bred watch firm living in harmony with other unique market luxury brands.Someday, I will write more about Mr. Jerome DeWitt, the considerate and bashful lover of all things mechanical who’s both an ancestor of Napoleon Bonaparte and likely a genius of sorts – as well as Ms. DeWitt, the search motor behind the performance who talks with New York-style purpose, and old-world landed aristocracy expectation.For now, I’d simply like to describe that the DeWitt Academia From Time watch and making this interesting timepiece. I kind of feel bad for individuals who aren’t able to see this view in person. The principal dial has two subdials using the left being a “flying time” indicator and the proper being a “beat second” indicator. The beat seconds hand is no more than a dead hand. DeWitt is really into dead seconds complications (consider for instance the cool DeWitt Academia Grand Tourbillon we proceed hands-on with here). These are when an otherwise sweeping seconds hand on a mechanical motion “ticks” similar to how seconds hands operate on quartz watches. For watch lovers, the irony is wonderful (in addition to the history of this functionality).

To the left of the beat second hand is something else interesting. This is the “flying time” dial and it is really a sort of foudroyante hand. Some watches that have hands that make a full revolution each second, and we refer to those as “flying hands.” The reason is that they appear to move so quickly, watchmakers say they are “flying.” Rather than a traditional hand, DeWitt developed two overlapping discs. The discs have small holes, and when the upper disc moves, it creates a unique animation on the dial.

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Jerome DeWitt explained that the purpose of the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time watch was to demonstrate the visual contrast between two different indicators that nevertheless operate each second. There is also the contrast between the slow and the fast. It is a poetic concept, and I have to admit that if I wore the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time on my wrist, I would probably be spending a lot of time idly staring at it.

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Otherwise, the dial merely indicates the time, and much of the upper part of the face looks relatively stark compared to the bottom of the dial. It is also unique how DeWitt borders each of the two subdials separately. It makes for a dial which looks both asymmetrical and symmetrical at the same time – which is something I don’t recall ever saying before.

DeWitt Academia Out Of Time Watch Hands-On Hands-On

Perhaps my favorite version of the DeWitt Academia Out Of Time watch is the model with the royal blue dial. Boy, does that one look cool. The odd movements on the dial mixed with the distinctive case and loud dial make for a decidedly “courtly” wrist statement. Anything but conservative, I just find it cool in a sort of excessive “see what fun toys I can afford” way.

Grand Seiko Blue Ceramic Hi-Beat GMT ‘Special’ Limited Edition SBGJ229-A Hands-On Perfect Clone Online Shopping


Grand Seiko Blue Ceramic Hi-Beat GMT 'Special' Limited Edition SBGJ229-A Hands-On Hands-On

The Grand Seiko Blue Ceramic Hi-beat GMT “Special” Limited Edition SBGJ229-A is the most imperfect watch that I still genuinely – and rather inexplicably – want. It’s full of faults which we’ll look at, but it still had something that made me want it right after I put it on my wrist. Here’s me trying to decipher what just happened and what Seiko’s logic had possibly been when they created this monster.

Grand Seiko Blue Ceramic Hi-Beat GMT 'Special' Limited Edition SBGJ229-A Hands-On Hands-On

All images by David Bredan

Let’s begin with the biggest issue of them all: the price. At $14,800, this is about double what other Grand Seiko GMTs are running for – or at least had been running for, before GS started aiming for rather more ambitious price levels as part of their weird non-Seiko-Grand Seiko branding strategy, introduced last year. Near as makes no difference, 15 grand for any four hand watch is extremely steep in my book and so there’d better be many and strong justifications to make my – and other responsible watch collector’s – wallet open wide enough to let this big sum slip out.

Grand Seiko Blue Ceramic Hi-Beat GMT 'Special' Limited Edition SBGJ229-A Hands-On Hands-On

When I learned Grand Seiko had produced a four-hand version of the ceramic-titanium chronographs that we’d been seeing in previous years, I, rather prematurely, got my hopes up for it coming in a smaller size… but that was not to be. The Grand Seiko SBGJ229-A is a whopping 46.4mm wide and 14.6mm thick – that is what seasoned watchmakers would call a big ass watch. Both the case and the bracelet are made from a combination of Seiko’s “high-intensity titanium” and their new, blue zirconia ceramic, seven times harder than stainless steel.

Grand Seiko Blue Ceramic Hi-Beat GMT 'Special' Limited Edition SBGJ229-A Hands-On Hands-On

The gargantuan size, I believe, is due to the way the case is constructed. Apparently there is a titanium core case that wraps around the movement like a regular case would and it is onto this titanium cladding that the ceramic panels are fixed. It’s like a titanium watch wearing ceramic armor. The thing is, however, that ceramic’s excessive surface hardness (and consequent resistance to scratches) comes at a price: a tendency to shatter upon impact. I have not enough reliable information on whether this “cored” ceramic, or a full ceramic case is more resistant to shocks, but at the end of the day, you’ll want to be really rather careful. Good job on Seiko’s end that the clasp is from titanium and not ceramic.

Grand Seiko Blue Ceramic Hi-Beat GMT 'Special' Limited Edition SBGJ229-A Hands-On Hands-On

DeWitt’s tenth anniversary is also marked by the launch of a new promotion campaign addressed to the “new emperors”. One of the illustrious forebears of manufacturer founder Jérôme p Witt, including many crowned heads of Europe, is the Emperor Napoleon the First. DeWitt is “drawing its rich roots and to projecting towards the present and the future by focusing on the new emperors of today and tomorrow, people throughout the world who have attained success.” In a nod to its own history, the brand provides a reinterpretation of its ancestor’s famous hand-in-waistcoat gesture through understated and elegant visuals appearing in both masculine and feminine versions. The “Revolutionary by Tradition” signature accentuates the concept of a watchmaker with a bold vision, that of “creating a different type of Haute Horlogerie that’s noble and authentic, combining age-old experience and exceptional technical excellence.” The newest visuals feature watches in the Twenty-8-Eight collection. In another nod to Napoleon, this group was conceived on August 28th, as a tribute to the man who was proclaimed “Emperor of the French” about the 28th of Floréal from the Republican Calendar. In 2013, it welcomes two new tourbillon models, issued in 99-piece restricted series, and two brand new retrograde seconds versions. The Twenty-8-Eight Tourbillons play contrasts with daring combinations of gold and glacier-toned PVD-coated titanium, or pink gold and bronze-toned PVD-coated titanium. The dials associate Art Deco motivated vertical appliques using a beaded circle enclosing the tourbillon carriage. Their highly graphic dials offered in two color variations are distinguished by a raised sunburst motif.

Grand Seiko Blue Ceramic Hi-Beat GMT 'Special' Limited Edition SBGJ229-A Hands-On Hands-On

So, this lovely pair of elephants in the room – the price and the proportions – addressed, let’s move on to the more easy-to-like aspects of the descriptively named Grand Seiko Blue Ceramic Hi-beat GMT “Special” Limited Edition SBGJ229-A. First is comfort which, although wasn’t exactly easy to assess with the show piece’s mile long bracelet, felt good thanks to the way the relatively lightweight case sat on the wrist and how the titanium and ceramic links of the bracelet wrapped around it – because both materials are warmer than steel, the bracelet felt like a row of small, smooth pebbles, for lack of a better comparison.

Grand Seiko Blue Ceramic Hi-Beat GMT 'Special' Limited Edition SBGJ229-A Hands-On Hands-On

Craftsmanship on the case and bracelet is impressive – though I was less impressed than I feel I’d need to be to justify spending 15 large ones. I can’t help but think that the “let’s screw ceramic pieces onto a titanium case” is neither a sound, nor an elegant solution for introducing ceramic, and, in truth, I’d like to see a full ceramic option for this price. Speaking of craftsmanship: while I understand a perfectly flush fit is extremely difficult to achieve and I’ll admit that this may be a pet peeve of mine, I’d nevertheless prefer to not be able to see through the gap between a bracelet’s end-link and the lug.

Grand Seiko Blue Ceramic Hi-Beat GMT 'Special' Limited Edition SBGJ229-A Hands-On Hands-On

I did say we’ll talk positives though, so I’ll add this: many say (presumably based on images alone) that ceramic looks like plastic and while I doubt that’s the case on these images, in hand anyone with a vague sense for quality will be able to tell GS’s ceramic apart from other materials. The edges are well defined but aren’t overly sharp, the surfaces are accurately formed and the surface has a deep sheen and a tendency to go from saturated blue into pale, satin blue. To the touch, as I said, it is smooth with no hard or unpleasant edges anywhere – it truly looks like a modern piece of armor wrapped around a more ordinary Seiko.

DeWitt Shines In The Glow Of Watch Dealer Shapur In San Francisco Replica Trusted Dealers


DeWitt Shines In The Glow Of Watch Dealer Shapur In San Francisco Hands-On

DeWitt Shines In The Glow Of Watch Dealer Shapur In San Francisco Hands-On

Thursday was a nice day in San Francisco, and I was excited about being invited to meet with Mr. Pierre Halimi Lachorlotte at Shapur here in San Francisco. Pierre is the General Manager of DeWitt watches here in America, which is a humble title for President of North American Operations. Another reason I was excited was the opportunity to see Shapur’s new and larger retail location, which just happened to be across the street from its previous location. I recall walking by the high-end watch shop often, gazing longingly into the windows, and always being encountered by a friendly associate upon entering – regardless of my attire.

Shapur’s new space is divided between two floors, and they have now added more brands to their showroom. Adding more soon as I understand. I would suggest that Shapur’s major competitor in San Francisco is Shreve & Co., a fight Shapur is winning in my opinion based upon selection, atmosphere, and employee amicability (though they do carry different brands).

Mother’s Day is on May 8, and watch aficionados know what that means: the chance to share their appreciation to mothers, sisters, wives, and other crucial ladies with a well-chosen timepiece. Between today and the day, we’ll highlight some noteworthy ladies’ watches we have found at this year’s watch fairs. First up are two new models from boutique haute horlogerie brand DeWitt, the Classic jewellery and Golden Afternoon.While the vibrant dials of both of these watches look at first glance to be ornately executed miniature paintings, this is not the case. The floral-themed, subtly textured imagery on the dials — which DeWitt predict “Japanese Spring” — is shaped by hand using the powder of precious gemstones, including gold, diamond, pearl, agate and gemstones. As you might expect, the two these watches are really limited, only 10 bits of each.The DeWitt Classic jewellery design has an 18k rose gold case, measuring 40 millimeters in diameter and place with a row of diamonds around the bezel. Its floral-motif dial provides “springtime colors” dominated by yellow, orange, and green, made with a pigment mix of powdered pearl, pearl, gold, platinum, tiger’s eye, malachite, quartz, and other diamonds. The side of this case has the DeWitt “Imperial Columns” design — a reference to royalty, especially to brand founder Jérôme DeWitt’s ancestor, Napoleon Bonaparte — along with also the openworked hour and minute hands are patterned after double-edged swords, yet another recurring theme of the brand.The watch includes a mechanical motion, DeWitt’s automatic grade DWHMS, using a 42-hour power book and a specially designed côtes-de-Genève-pattern rotor, which is visible via a sapphire caseback. The timeless Jewellery Japanese Spring view has a shiny green alligator strap, using a polished rose-gold pin buckle engraved with a DeWitt “W.” It is priced at $71,500.

As I walked upstairs that day I was immediately greeted by Pierre. I am not at the point where I can afford a DeWitt watch (in fact I might never be at that point), but that didn’t stop them from treating me like a valued client. My enthusiasm for talking about watches was enough, and for that I was genuinely touched. My typical experience with high end watch dealers consists of them briefly acknowledging me, and faster still dismissing me as a non-sale for the observable future. That day was different, and I wanted to make the most of it.

DeWitt Shines In The Glow Of Watch Dealer Shapur In San Francisco Hands-On

DeWitt Shines In The Glow Of Watch Dealer Shapur In San Francisco Hands-On

Shapur and DeWitt treated me fondly, as an colleague almost. My time there was precious, and a major reason for my visit was the DeWitt WX-1 Concept watch. The $650,000 timepiece creation that materialized a few months ago. The watch deserves a full length article alone, which you can view here. Suffice to say, I had my time with novel watch, and there is much to say about it. The majority of its charm and intrigue exist on a far deeper level than its Jules Verne inspired spaceship looks.

It may seem odd how I place emphasis on my treatment by the watch retailer and company, but it is important to place it in perspective. We are talking about timepieces which on the low end are roughly $20,000. On the high end… well I already mentioned the price of the WX-1 watch. Compare that with how you are treated at an expensive car dealer. Are you given the time of day? DeWitt has watches that cost an equal amount to a brand new Lamborghini or Ferrari, and not merely the “entry-level” models. It would be no surprise, even expected, for DeWitt to treat any non-potential customer, as so many other pretentious companies do. Though this was not the case as I have mentioned, and this attitude is not the status quo for the industry. I cannot commend them enough for their maturity, and foresight that true public relations is with the entire interest public, and not merely an ultra limited demographic.

I have precious few minutes to spend at the meeting at Shapur due to an appointment back at the office, so I wanted to make the most of it. While Mr. Halimi attended to other guests, I took notice of the other DeWitt watches presented. Chronographs, perpetual calendars, and tourbillons (or combinations thereof), where among the offerings. Also on display were the new DeWitt Tourbillon Force Constant and Night Chronograph in Rose Gold (wonderful for its “propeller” seconds subdial). The 15 or so watches represented a significant portion of the DeWitt watches that come to America each year. The brand typically produces about 1000 examples of its watches annually, most of which are not US bound. This was a rare opportunity to become acquainted with the brand by sampling so much of it.

DeWitt Shines In The Glow Of Watch Dealer Shapur In San Francisco Hands-On

DeWitt Shines In The Glow Of Watch Dealer Shapur In San Francisco Hands-On

No other watch brand I know of resembles the unique looks of DeWitt. Frankly, it is hard to copy them, though I am sure many have tried. The construction and time involved in making their watches is intense. As I admire a perpetual calendar model I notice the moon on the moonphase indicator looks like a pearl, underneath a darker pearl layer, set against a lustrous painting meant to resemble stars. The effect is nice, classy, and very difficult to reproduce. Materials on these watches blend well, and the squared alternating material pattern on the bezels (an iconic DeWitt look) is set together so well. Having handled enough watches, I can tell the quality of these watches is more than just the raw materials put into them. A deep sense of craftsman-like affection is apparent in the perfect fit and finish of each watch. Perhaps it is a shame that one must invest this kind of money to get a item that is put together so well, but I am relieved that in this world of mass production and disposable goods, such things still exist that are put together by hand, with skill and knowledge accumulated in over two centuries of practice.

The young associate at Shapur enthusiastically discusses the DeWitt watches, and how they sell. He mentions the fact that many younger buyers are drawn to the DeWitt pieces. This fact does not surprise me, save for the reality that DeWitt watches are hard to come by, and you have to actively look for them. What I means is that most DeWitt buyers learn about them through investigation and discovery. You’d have to be looking at a dedicated watch magazine to know about DeWitt, or be lucky enough to visit one of the rare locations that carry them. Otherwise, the uninitiated consider something like Rolex, when the opportunity presents itself to buy a nice watch. Mr. Halimi of DeWitt is particularly proud of the fact that DeWitt buyers are watch lovers, learning about the brand, and making a conscious decision to acquire a DeWitt after considering the alternatives (at least from a price perspective). This is certainly not how an average business person would respond, and I am comforted by the fact that DeWitt, is not an average business. For it if was, my impression is that the watches would unfortunately not be the same (because quality and profitability are typically not in accord); another reason I am so drawn to the watch industry.

I will go back to Shapur – more often now most likely at their enhanced location. Their new shop is a nice place to look at nice watches, and they are a friendly conglomeration of family and dedicated employees. I am sure I will make an excellent customer once I am able to make the occasional investment in their goods.

You can find DeWitt, among other beautiful watch brands at:

Shapur Mozaffarian
272 Post St.
San Francisco, CA 94108
(415) 392-1200